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Effects of Divorce

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Effects of Divorce
Divorce often introduces immense changes into the lives of all involved, namely the parents, children, as well as the society. Witnessing the breakup of marriage between their parents, the constant absence of one parent, and the challenges of adjusting to the life of having to move to and from two different households can all be extremely challenging to the children. In other words, parental divorce is usually a defining moment in the lives of the children in the sense that the life that follows is considerably different from the one before. Even though most Western societies have dealt successfully with the stigma associated with divorce, its effects on the couples, children, and the society cannot be overlooked.
The effects of divorce on the parents may be analyzed from the perspective of women and men. Women usually experience less stress and superior adjustment compared to men. This is because they are likely to seek social support and assistance from others (Sussman and Suzanne 429). Nevertheless, it is imperative to note that working women who place their children in childcare are often stigmatized compared to men under similar circumstances. Conversely, divorced men are often confronted with considerable emotional adjustment due to feelings of loss resulting from loss of social connection and intimacy and the disruption of parenting. Generally, divorce can have negative psychological effects on both men and women, and the parents may sometimes require counseling to adjust.

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For children, divorce can have negative effects such as depression, problems with academic performance, and even delinquency. Divorce often diminishes the capacity of the child to learn, thereby leading to poor academic performance. In addition, children who witness divorce and marital conflict are more likely to become delinquents (Siegel and Joseph 286). However, it should be apparent that the psychological reactions of children to parental divorce vary depending on the quality of relationship with both parents prior to and after the divorce, the intensity and length of parental conflict leading to divorce, as well as the ability of both parents to cater to the needs of the children post divorce.
The continued involvement of children with the parents permits for a more balanced and realistic future relationship since children often learn how to conduct themselves in relationships by observing their parents. With regard to family life, divorce permanently breaks family bonds, thereby weakening the relationship between parents and their children. It leads to caustic ways of dealing with disputes, reduces social competence, and weakens the sense of femininity or masculinity among the young adults, which can cause problems in dating; higher rates of divorce in later life, less desire among young adults for children, as well as higher anticipation of divorce (Sussman and Suzanne 352). For the community, studies have established that neighborhoods with lower divorce rates have higher informal and formal social controls, such as child supervision, that ultimately reduce the rates of crime (Fairchild and Harry 34).
While the effects of divorce are largely negative, it can sometimes have positive effects. For instance, divorce can be beneficial when the marriage is characterized by intense conflict, as well as in instances where the children are frequently exposed to abusive substances and physical and psychological abuse. In such cases, divorce leads to self-healing, better health, and an opportunity for the children to grow up in an environment that facilitates the learning of healthy social skills.

Works Cited
Fairchild, Erika, and Harry R. Dammer. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 2013. Print.
Siegel, Larry J, and Joseph J. Senna. Juvenile Delinquency: Theory, Practice, and Law. St. Paul, MN: West Pub. Co, 2014. Print.
Sussman, Marvin B, and Suzanne K. Steinmetz. Handbook of Marriage and the Family. New York: Plenum Press, 2013. Print.

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